Peacemakers Vs. Cowards


When I was young, I was trained to respect myself. Traditionally this would be mean that I would have to be quick on my feet and mind. To be able to respond to people with an equal measure of aggression or more. To be able to show people that you can’t be messed with and if they did they would learn lessons real fast.

If you did’t have any of the above mentioned qualities, you are more likely to be taken advantage of and be disenfranchised. In simple words you are likely a coward or a wimp.

So, this is where my world collides with reality. I am not an aggressive person, neither am I quick on my feet or mind. When a hot head riles me up, I am more likely to be stunt not knowing how to respond. Even when I know that I have been gravely wronged, I am still framing responses, while the other person has accused me, labelled me and assigned me his fair share of punishment and is already on his way.

All my life I have been beating myself up, because of my inability to respond to people in kind. More than the hurt inflicted by another person, I hate myself because of my inability to respond in an equal manner of aggression or hostility.  I can’t help myself, because I can’t find a means to release my anger.

Recently something happened and I was extremely mad at the person who hurt me, but even more mad at myself. I just did’t know what to do. Then out of the blue, I heard [Translation: A quick thought flew through my head] the words Jesus said “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of GOD: Mat 5:9”. The words stuck; and a realization followed.

I have had people say that I am a coward, that I can’t stand up for myself. It’s true, but this new realization has prompted me to understand that the real reason I refuse to jump into the fray is because I dislike confrontations. I am trying to find a peaceful means of resolving a situation. It is not something that I have been doing consciously, it was more of a sub conscious decision. Hence my knee jerk reaction has always been to avoid confrontations and find a peaceful solution.

I have now found peace. I will no longer blame myself or be angry again because of my inability to react with aggression because I know I will be called a child of GOD. That was Jesus’ promise.

Hold that thought because, I am now wondering weather I am a peacemaker or a pain avoid-er… hmm m  I  am lost again…

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Compassion for Your Neighbor


But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was. And when he saw him, he had compassion.
Luke 10:33

Context is so important when reading the Bible! Take the story of the Good Samaritan for instance (Luke 10:25-37). Everyone knows the story: a man being kind to a stranger. But there is more to the story. Jesus told it in response to a question from a lawyer: “Who is my neighbor?” (verse 29) That is, since the Law says “love your neighbor” (Leviticus 19:18), who is my neighbor? Who am I bound to love?

Jesus answered the question with a story: A Jew was set upon by robbers who stole his goods and left him for dead. Two Jewish religious leaders passed by and ignored the man’s plight. But when a cultural enemy of the man came by—a Samaritan—he stopped to help the injured man. The Samaritan “had compassion” on the man. He bound the man’s wounds, took him to an inn, and paid for his care. The Samaritan used what resources he had with him—oil, wine, money—to meet the injured stranger’s needs. Jesus’ point: Compassion is based not on wealth or party lines; it is based on a willingness to help with whatever we have.

Who is your neighbor? On whom can you have compassion today? If your resources match another’s need, do what you can.

My neighbor is anyone whose need I see, whose need God puts me in a position to meet.
Haddon Robinson

Today’s Ear-worm: Hymn for the Missing – Red Lyrics


Tried to walk together
But the night was growing dark
Thought you were beside me
But I reached and you were gone
Sometimes I hear you calling
From some lost and distant shore
I hear you crying softly
For the way it was before
Where are you now?
Are you lost?
Will I find you again?
Are you alone?
Are you afraid?
Are you searching for me?
Why did you go?
I had to stay.
Now I’m reaching for you
Will you wait, will you wait?
Will I see you again?
You took it with you when you left
These scars are just a trace
Now it wanders lost and wounded
This heart that I misplaced
Where are you now?
Are you lost?
Will I find you again?
Are you alone?
Are you afraid?
Are you searching for me?
Why did you go?
I had to stay.
Now I’m reaching for you
Will you wait, will you wait?
Will I see you again?

Filled to Overflowing


The Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Savior.
Titus 3:5-6

The concept of pouring something out has a strong biblical basis. In the Old Testament sacrifices, containers of ashes (Leviticus 4:12) and blood (Deuteronomy 12:27) were poured out. Job (Job 30:16) and Hannah (1 Samuel 1:15) poured out their souls before the Lord. God poured out His wrath on rebellious Israel (2 Chronicles 34:21). Indeed, the Old Testament’s use of the image of pouring is frequently connected to wrath.

It is no surprise that, oftentimes in the New Testament, the use of “pouring out” is the opposite of wrath: It is God pouring out His Spirit (Acts 2:33; 10:45) and His love (Romans 5:5; Titus 3:3-7). In the Old Testament, God poured out His wrath upon sin and sinners; in the New Testament He pours out His love. What does the image suggest? We have been filled to overflowing with God’s Spirit and love—love being a manifestation of the presence of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22). He poured out His wrath on Jesus and His love on those for whom Jesus died.

God has filled you with His love so you can share it with others. Pour out your overflow of God’s love to someone today.

He that is in love with the world will be out of love with the cross.
Thomas Watson

The True Love Story


Hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all sins.
Proverbs 10:12

The 1970 dramatic film Love Story introduced one of the most oft-quoted lines about love in the modern era: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” One of the stars of that film, Ryan O’Neal—who had the words spoken to him by his dying girlfriend—was in a romantic-comedy movie two years later with Barbra Streisand (What’s Up, Doc?). In that movie, when Streisand says those same words to O’Neal, he responds, “That’s the dumbest thing I ever heard.”

Most people would agree with the 1972 assessment from What’s Up Doc? of “love means never having to say you’re sorry.” But there’s a kernel of truth there. After all, “love covers all sins” (Proverbs 10:12; see also 1 Peter 4:8). Theoretically, that means one doesn’t have to say “sorry” to be forgiven. But biblically, there is a problem; there is a price to pay for sin: death (Romans 6:23). And Jesus paid that price for us—unconditionally. Jesus introduced true unconditional love to the human experience, paying a horrific price for our sins. But that doesn’t mean we are exempt from saying “sorry” when we sin (1 John 1:9).

Let unconditional love be the basis for all your relationships. But if you sin, always say “sorry” to God and others.

Repentance is being sorry enough to quit your sin.
Albert Martin